Something beautiful, something good.

Lately my daughter ask me to write my Memoire. That song from Bill Gaither encapsule well the main team of my memoire. It’s about my Journey with God.

Something beautiful, something good
All my confusion He understood
All I had to offer Him was brokenness and strife
But he made something beautiful of my life

If there ever were dreams
That were lofty and noble
They were my dreams at the start
And hope for life’s best were the hopes
That I harbor down deep in my heart
But my dreams turned to ashes
And my castles all crumbled, my fortune turned to loss
So I wrapped it all in the rags of life
And laid it at the cross.

God First

Am I ready to love God above everything else? Above my passions, my possessions, even my own family? Here is an excellent devotion written by
Hannah Whitall Smith. It reminds me of the story when God ask Abraham to offer his own son Isaac (Genesis 22).

The Lord has shown me another step. Today the question has been presented to me whether I would be willing to lose my darling child, my little daughter Mary, for the sake of the revelation of the Lord Jesus Himself to me. It was a battle, but my Saviour has triumphed. It came simply to this point, Would I keep my daughter, and remain a cold and lukewarm Christian all my life, living at a distance from my Saviour, and unbaptized by His Spirit; or, would I give her up, that I might see Him in His beauty, and know Him to dwell in my heart in all His fullness.
Thanks be unto His Name, He has worked in me to choose the latter! I desire Him even more than I desire my precious, my darling daughter! And now surely the last link to earth is broken, for, without my daughter, life would be desolate indeed. I am wholly the Lord’s now.
Oh what hinders Him from blessing me! Still I wait and pray that He will reveal Himself that He will baptize me with the Holy Ghost!
—Journal, April 22, 1868

Hannah Whitall Smith and Melvin Easterday Dieter, The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life: The Unpublished Personal Writings of Hannah Whitall Smith (Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997).

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All on the Altar


As much as I have objected to it and disapproved of it in the past, I have been brought to the point of entire consecration. I find that the soul which wants to live the life hid with Christ in God must be entirely given up to Him—and definitely given up too. I must present my body a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable unto Him, which is my reasonable service.
And I do! Lord Jesus, here and now I definitely yield myself up unreservedly to you. All that I have and all that I am, both now and in the whole future of my life, I lay upon your altar. Everything is yours, and I am yours to follow you wherever you may lead me.
Oh Lord Jesus, let this be a reality! Bring this consecration about in me and through me, and keep it. You know my utter weakness, and to you I commit myself in this. Oh I ask you, let me never, never, never, draw back from the transaction of this moment. Let me never for a moment take back the slightest thing of all I have now consecrated or surrendered to you. Make it a reality.
—Hannah Whitall Smith, Journal, March 30, 1868

Benefit of Mediating God’s Word

The Spirit-filled walk demands, for instance, that we live in the Word of God as a fish lives in the sea. By this I do not mean that we study the Bible merely, nor that we take a “course” in Bible doctrine. I mean that we should “meditate day and night” in the sacred Word, that we should love it and feast upon it and digest it every hour of the day and night.

A. W. Tozer, ‘The Divine Conquest’ p.125

After the Wilderness—Rest


It seems to me the “Reckon ye yourselves to be dead to sin” cannot be found in the Red Sea passage but rather in the passage of the Jordan. There they were commanded to “sanctify themselves” (Joshua 3:5). There, at Gilgal, they were called to a second circumcision and there we are told that the Lord “rolled away the reproach of Egypt” from off them. Does not all this signify far more than the scene of the Red Sea tells us? Have we not in Romans 6:11 Gilgal reckoning, in Romans 6:12 Gilgal separation, and in Colossians 3:1 Gilgal dwelling? We can easily see how an Israelite must have felt his separation from Egypt when he was circumcised like this in the land of promise; and we can only know the manifest rolling away of the reproach of Egypt, as we stand by faith in heavenly places, and walk even as Christ walked in newness of life. Then too the manna ceased after they had crossed the river and they ate the old corn of the land.
So when we realize ourselves as a heavenly people, it is Christ who belongs to heaven that we feed upon, a risen Christ seated at the right hand of God, ever living to make intercession for us. Certainly the land of rest was a better place than the wilderness, and it was only the failure of the Israelites, or rather their unbelief, that kept them out of it so long. So that they were practically walking in sin during all those forty years, delivered from Egypt it is true, but very far from being in the place or the position that God had called them to. Both passages were types of the death of Christ, but of that death viewed in two aspects.
And does not this way of viewing them run parallel with the experience of nearly every Christian? First we know redemption from the guilt of sin merely and deliverance from the bondage of Satan; then we wander in a wilderness truly having God with us, as He was with the Israelites and sustained by His bread sent down from heaven, pleasing Him sometimes, grieving him often, needing strict discipline, and growing footsore and tired. Then at last we see that our crucifixion with Christ has a fuller meaning and leads us into higher privileges and we cross the Jordan and enter into the rest of faith, into the life hid with Christ in God, and all our wanderings are over forever.
—To Anna, September 4, 1867

Hannah Whitall Smith and Melvin Easterday Dieter, The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life: The Unpublished Personal Writings of Hannah Whitall Smith (Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997).

Fill Me Now

A few months before 2000 my family became homeless because of a fire in the kitchen. One couple let us used one of there apartment, to small for a family of 6 children, but it was a roof over us. A dear brother in the Lord introduce me to the little hymn ‘Fill My Cup, Lord.’

Fill my cup, Lord; I lift it up Lord;
Come and quench this thirsting of my soul.
Bread of Heaven, feed me till I want no more.
Fill my cup, fill it up and make me whole.

I wonder if that devotion inspire the author of that hymn?

Fill Me Lord

The longing of my soul to be filled with God is not satisfied yet. I have seen and realized much of the joy and rest of a life of faith since last I wrote in this book, but I am sure there is still a greater work of grace which it is my privilege to experience by faith. I want the conscious indwelling of the Spirit. I want the manifested presence of my Jesus in my soul! I want, in short, to be filled with all the fullness of God! This is my privilege, I am not sure what is it that holds me back.
Oh my God, sanctify me wholly. I don’t know what this means exactly—I am ignorant of the extent to which the cleansing blood of Jesus can purify, but whatever it is, oh my Saviour, grant it to me to the very utmost limit! I lack wisdom on this subject, and I come to you in faith to teach me. Let me know your own mind fully and let nothing keep me from entering in to all the rest of faith that you have in store for me. Oh! don’t let me frustrate your grace. This is my longing cry—don’t let me in any way or in the slightest degree frustrate your grace.
Oh Lord, fill me now! Fill me now! Shed abroad your love in my heart now! Sanctify me wholly now!
—Journal, September 3, 1867

Hannah Whitall Smith and Melvin Easterday Dieter, The Christian’s Secret of a Holy Life: The Unpublished Personal Writings of Hannah Whitall Smith (Oak Harbor: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 1997).

Time Alone With God

I am beginning to learn more and more of the depth of meaning in the teachings of Christ. I find myself, since this new life in Jesus has opened before me, turning far oftener to His own words. Thirty years after Jesus ascension He saw that the church was getting lazy in her communion with Him. Jesus reveal himself to the apostle John to gave him a message for His church. Since they are Jesus last words, we should pay attention to them.

In Revelation 3: 20 we read “If you hear my voice and open the door, I will come in, and we will share (time) together as friends.” Jesus remind the Christian community that communion with Him is a vital element of our Christian life.



In Genesis 24:63 we see that Isaac took time to be alone with God, he meditate on who God is.

Today, take time to be holy! Read God’s Word and meditate on them.